Curated

Interesting links: February 2019

N-1, being launched, about a minute before it blew up, 1969.

A few years ago, when it suddenly occurred to us that the internet was a place we could never leave, I began to keep a diary of what it felt like to be there in the days of its snowy white disintegration, which felt also like the disintegration of my own mind. My interest was not academic. I did not care about the Singularity, or the rise of the machines, or the afterlife of being uploaded into the cloud. I cared about the feeling that my thoughts were being dictated. I cared about the collective head, which seemed to be running a fever. But if we managed to escape, to break out of the great skull and into the fresh air, if Twitter was shut down for crimes against humanity, what would we be losing? The bloodstream of the news, the thrilled consensus, the dance to the tune of the time. The portal that told us, each time we opened it, exactly what was happening now. It seemed fitting to write it in the third person because I no longer felt like myself.

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Curated

Interesting links: January 2019

An illustration from a story in an old issue of Astounding (credit: New York times)
Curated

Interesting links: December 2018

Asperatus clouds
Curated

Interesting links: November 2018

Orbital sunrise (credit: ESA/NASA)

 

Happy Holidays!

Curated

Interesting links: October 2018

 

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Unattached Vortex above floating dandelion seeds (Copyright: Nature)

 

The doctor noticed that the student’s head seemed a little larger than normal and he referred him to Dr Lorber for further examination.

Dr Lorber examined the boy’s head by Cat-scan to discover that the student had virtually no brain …

In hydrocephalus the cerebrospinal fluid, which circulates through brain channels called ventricles builds up pressure that balloons up the ventricles pressing the overlying brain tissue against the cranium. This insult from within causes a loss of brain matter and many hydrocephalics suffer intellectual and physical impairment …

Hydrocephalus is usually fatal in the first months of childhood and, if an individual survives, he/she is usually seriously handicapped. However, the Sheffield student lived a normal life and graduated with an honours degree in mathematics.

Curated

Interesting links: September 2018

 

Ancient cities in northern Guatemala, discovered through jungle-penetrating LIDAR.

 

Curated

New movie trailers!

Decided to relax a bit tonight and catch up on trailers of upcoming movies, here are the ones I’m excited about: